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MC 00332 Preliminary Inventory of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Collection, 1986 - 1988

Material remains in the order that it was received.
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[Box 1, Folder 1]
[Box 1, Folder 5]
[Box 3, Folder 5]
[Box 8, Folder 1]

Creator

United States. Dept. of Energy. Environmental Impacts Division.

Quantity

4.0 Linear feet

General Physical Description note

8 archival boxes

Location

For current information on the location of these materials, please consult the Special Collections Research Center Reference Staff external link.

Language

English

Acquisitions Information

Unknown.

Processing

Processed by: Michael Watts;machine-readable finding aid created by: Michael Watts

Scope and Content Note

This collection contains North Carolina's site proposal, a feasibility assessment, notes, United States Department of Energy Environmental Impact Statements, audiocassettes, and videocassettes, and a few other related items pertaining to the development, design, and siting of a Superconducting Super Collider (SSC).

Biographical Note

The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) was to be a ring particle accelerator, proton-proton collider, and high-energy physics laboratory that was to have had a ring circumference of fifty-four miles. It was initially suggested in 1982 by a National Reference Designs Study with its design completed and construction approved by 1987.

North Carolina was considered as a possible location for the Superconducting Supercollider and a building site was chosen that extended the circular underground structure through areas in Durham, Granville, and Person counties. Out of the twenty-five possible locations that were considered, North Carolina was deemed the best nationally in terms of the most important site criterion: geology.

The North Carolina site proposal was submitted in August 1987 and chosen in December 1987 by a committee from the National Academy of Sciences as one of seven of the final sites possible in the United States for construction of the project. The eleven billion dollar project was awarded, however, to a site in Texas that was advocated by then Vice President George H. W. Bush. In 1988, Waxahachie, Texas was selected as the location best suited for the Superconducting Super Collider. Construction of the Superconducting Super Collider was begun near Waxahachie, Texas, but the project was cancelled by Congress in 1993.

Access to Collection

This collection is open for research; access requires at least 24 hours advance notice.

For more information contact us via mail, phone, fax, or our web form.

Mail

Special Collections Research Center
Box 7111
Raleigh, NC, 27695-7111

Telephone

(919) 515-2273

Fax

(919) 513-1787

Preferred Citation

[Identification of item], Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Collection, MC 332, Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC

Access to Collection

The nature of the NCSU Libraries' Special Collections means that copyright or other information about restrictions may be difficult or even impossible to determine despite reasonable efforts. The NCSU Libraries claims only physical ownership of most Special Collections materials.

The materials from our collections are made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user must assume full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used for academic research or otherwise should be fully credited with the source.

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